Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘steven aftergood’

Smoke billows from the World Trade Center in New York, on September 11, 2001. (Photo: Ruth Fremson / The New York Times)

Report: Intelligence Unit Told Before 9/11 to Stop Tracking Bin Laden

Monday 23 May 2011

by: Jeffrey Kaye, Truthout

A great deal of controversy has arisen about what was known about the movements and location of Osama bin Laden in the wake of his killing by US Special Forces on May 2 in Abbottabad, Pakistan. Questions about what intelligence agencies knew or didn’t know about al-Qaeda activities go back some years, most prominently in the controversy over the existence of a joint US Special Forces Command and Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) data mining effort known as “Able Danger.”

What hasn’t been discussed is a September 2008 Department of Defense (DoD) inspector general (IG) report, summarizing an investigation made in response to an accusation by a Joint Forces Intelligence Command (JFIC) whistleblower, which indicated that a senior JFIC commander had halted actions tracking Osama bin Laden prior to 9/11. JFIC is tasked with an intelligence mission in support of United States Joint Force Command (USJFCOM).

The report, titled “Review of Joint Forces Intelligence Command Response to 9/11 Commission,” was declassified last year, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request from Steven Aftergood at the Federation of American Scientists.

The whistleblower, who the IG report identified as a former JFIC employee represented only by his codename “IRON MAN,” claimed in letters written to both the DoD inspector general in May 2006 and, lacking any apparent action by the IG, to the Office of the National Director of Intelligence (ODNI) in October 2007, that JFIC had withheld operational information about al-Qaeda when queried in March 2002 about its activities by the DIA and higher command officials on behalf of the 9/11 Commission. The ODNI passed the complaint back to the IG, who then opened an investigation under the auspices of the deputy inspector general for intelligence.

MORE HERE

Read Full Post »

Oops! Feds ‘Accidentally’ Release 266-page Document Mapping Out U.S. Nuclear Sites

Posted by Liliana Segura, AlterNet at 8:00 AM on June 3, 2009.

“These screw-ups happen,” said one former director of central intelligence.

From the Better than Fiction department: the New York Times reports that the U.S. government has “accidentally” released a list of nuclear sites around the country — but don’t worry, everything’s fine.

“The federal government mistakenly made public a 266-page report, its pages marked ‘highly confidential,’ that gives detailed information about hundreds of the nation’s civilian nuclear sites and programs, including maps showing the precise locations of stockpiles of fuel for nuclear weapons,” the Times reported last night.

The document, which was disclosed earlier this week “in an online newsletter devoted to issues of federal secrecy,” is described as containing “an exhaustive listing of the sites that make up the nation’s civilian nuclear complex, which stretches coast to coast and includes nuclear reactors and highly confidential sites at weapon laboratories.”

It was only last night, following inquiries from the Times, that the top secret document was taken down from the website of the Government Printing Office.

But don’t worry, consensus among “nuclear experts” is apparently that “any dangers from the disclosure were minimal.”

“These screw-ups happen,” said one former director of central intelligence.

But others aren’t convinced. Steven Aftergood, of the Federation of American Scientists, “expressed bafflement at its disclosure, calling it ‘a one-stop shop for information on U.S. nuclear programs.'”

The New York Times has more.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: