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Posts Tagged ‘Reconciliation’

Reconciliation: Definition from the 1895 Edition of Funk & Wagnels

Acquiescence is a legal term used to describe an act of a person in knowingly standing by without raising any objection to infringement of his rights, when someone else is unknowingly and honestly putting in his resources under the impression that the said rights actually belong to him. Consequently, the person whose rights are infringed cannot anymore make a claim against the infringer or succeed in an injunction suit due to his conduct. The term is most generally, “permission” given by silence or passiveness. Acceptance or agreement by keeping quiet or by not making objections.

So, I guess that the question is…Who is being reconciled here? We the people or the corporate government?
Dennis Kucinich is saying, in essence, that the Corporate interests must reconcile themselves to the interests of We The People. The majority of the people want an adequate health insurance program with a public option, preferably an option that guarantees health care that is not ran by profit motivated corporations. The alternative health care program set up by the corporate controlled senate will cost more than the one that is already in place and will produce government legislation that will force folks to buy insurance that couldn’t afford it in the first place, while corporate executives skim off record profits and bonuses.

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Republicans Setting Filibuster Record

STEVEN R. HURST | 03/ 1/10 02:03 PM | AP

WASHINGTON — The filibuster – tool of obstruction in the U.S. Senate – is alternately blamed and praised for wilting President Barack Obama’s ambitious agenda. Some even say it’s made the nation ungovernable.

Maybe, maybe not. Obama’s term still has three years to run.

More certain, however: Opposition Republicans are using the delaying tactic at a record-setting pace.

“The numbers are astonishing in this Congress,” says Jim Riddlesperger, political science professor at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth.

The filibuster, using seemingly endless debate to block legislative action, has become entrenched like a dandelion tap root in the midst of the shrill partisanship gripping Washington.

But the filibuster is nothing new. Its use dates to the mists of Senate history, but until the civil rights era, it was rarely used.

A tactic unique to the Senate, the filibuster means a simple majority guarantees nothing when it comes to passing laws.

“The rules of the Senate are designed to give muscle to the minority,” said Senate historian Donald Ritchie.

With the Senate now made up of 100 members, two for each of the 50 states, an opposition filibuster can only be broken with 60 votes – a three-fifths majority.

MORE HERE

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