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A coleague  just resently recieved this in the mail from the future CEO of this company. We’re excited about moving forward on this and anticipate putting food on the table on a global basis. and as far as promotion goes, all options will be on the table.

When the times get tough, the Oregonians get tougher. This is a sure candidate for a small business loan because it will involve the defense industries that are already in place in the Middle East. They should be able to supply plenty of camel meat with Monsanto’s help. With the genes of rabbits, and a little genetic engineering, there should be plenty of Dromedaries to go around. Monsanto is probably already working on some drought and radiation resistant strains of wadi brush to feed them.

This is our call, fellow Oregonians. We can form cottage industries in all aspects of  this unique food production, from the field to the final market. We will need experts in processing, packaging, advertizing, and delivery of the products. Shouldn’t take long to get this off the ground, with all the rain lately, we might still get in a crop of rice. There will be more on this after our first board meeting. We will also, no doubt, need some executives …G:

hat tip to george

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February 28, 2011 Pay Up, Corporate Tax Dodgers
We’re chumps unless we force Congress to stop tax haven abuse.

By Chuck Collins

Instead of cutting state and federal budgets, the United States should crack down on the corporate tax dodgers thumbing their noses at us.

Across the nation, states are making deep cuts that will wreck the quality of life for everyone to close budget gaps that total more than $100 billion.

But there’s a more sensible option. Overseas tax havens enable companies to pretend their profits are earned in other countries like the Cayman Islands. Simply making that ruse illegal would bring home an estimated $100 billion a year.

The next time you read a story about some politician bemoaning that “there’s no money” and “we have to make cuts,” just point to artful tax dodgers in our midst.

They include some of the banks that trashed the economy but gladly took our tax dollars to stay alive after the economic meltdown. Bank of America. Wells Fargo. Citigroup.

Goldman Sachs took a $10 billion taxpayer bailout but then gamed its effective tax rate down to one percent through what its shakedown-artist executives call “changes in geographic earnings mix.” Shame on them. Pay up.

See that FedEx delivery van go by on the roads you paid for? Pay up FedEx! Don’t pretend you’re not making billions in the U.S. Don’t lie and tell us you made all those profits on some island with more palm trees than people. We know the demand for coconut delivery isn’t that big.

These corporations are heavy users of our taxpayer funded public infrastructure and property rights protection systems. They use our regulated marketplace, call upon our law enforcement system and judiciary to remedy disputes. They’re protected by U.S. police forces and firefighters. They enjoy all the privileges and benefits of tax-paying citizens. They just don’t pay their fair share for them.

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Hat tip to Carl in the morning who interviewed Chuck Collins this morning on Air America. KPOJ 620 am radio.

Chuck Collins w/ Institute for Policy Studies IPS

extremeinequality.org

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The Huffington Post

Lloyd Chapman

On April 26th, President Barack Obama established a Small Business Task Force to supposedly remove barriers to small businesses landing contracts with the federal government. I had to laugh out loud. This was amusing to me for many reasons, but most notably, President Obama ignored the recommendations of his last small business task force. It was established during his presidential campaign, and I was on it.

We spent months coming up with solid and practical solutions to help small businesses. He never adopted a single one of our recommendations. It turned out to be the first of many Obama, “all talk and no action,” programs for small businesses.

In my humble opinion, the number one barrier to small businesses landing more federal contracts is President Obama himself. All you need to do is take a quick look at President Obama’s actual track record for small businesses to predict what the recommendations of his small business task force will be.

Since 2003, a series of federal investigations have found that most federal small business contracts actually go to Fortune 500 firms. Report 5-15 from the Small Business Administration (SBA) Inspector General referred to the rampant fraud and abuse as, “One of the most important challenges facing the Small Business Administration and the entire Federal government today…” (http://www.asbl.com/documents/05-15.pdf) The SBA IG has reported this as the number one management challenge facing the SBA for the last five consecutive years.

The latest data released by the Obama Administration clearly, and undeniably, shows the largest recipient of federal small business contracts last year was Textron, Inc., a Fortune 500 firm with over 43,000 employees and over $14 billion a year in annual revenue. Other firms that received U.S. government small business contracts included, Lockheed Martin, Dell Computer, Xerox, General Dynamics, ManTech, Raytheon, Boeing, Office Depot and General Electric.

President Obama was clearly aware of this issue in February of 2008, when he released the statement, “It is time to end the diversion of federal small business contracts to corporate giants.” (http://www.barackobama.com/2008/02/26/the_american_small_business_le.php) To date, he has consistently refused to adopt any polices to keep his campaign promise and end the daily flow of over $400 million a day in federal small business contracts to corporate giants.

It gets worse. On March 12th of this year the Obama Administration removed, and potentially permanently destroyed ten-years worth of data that had been used by federal investigators to uncover billions of dollars in fraud and abuse in federal small business contracting programs. Obama officials removed the “small business flag,” field, in which Fortune 500 firms have illegally misrepresented themselves as small businesses for years. Report 5-16 from the SBA IG referred to these misrepresentations as, “false certifications” and “improper certifications.” Other federal investigations described the blatant fraud as “vendor deception.” Now all evidence of the abuses has been removed.

~More~

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Recently,former national security adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski chaired RAND Corporation’s Middle East Advisory Board, and he had some choice remarks that do not exactly exude optimism. He stated clearly, Withdrawal is not in the range of policy options. Brzezinski then noted that within three months the war in Afghanistan will be the “longest war in US history,” and warned that the U.S. could be “bogged down there for another decade or so.” At the same time, he argued, the world impact of an early US departure “would be utterly devastating.”

November 14, 2009 at 23:35:59

For OpEdNews: Sandy Shanks – Writer
Due to recent reports, for those still clinging to the forlorn hope that America’s military involvement in Afghanistan would end reasonably soon, such hope has turned to despair. Perhaps some Americans, those interested in literature at any rate, will recall the poetic words of an Englishman named Rudyard Kipling.

It is not wise for the Christian white
To hustle the Asian brown;
For the Christian riles
And the Asian smiles
And weareth the Christian down.

At the end of the fight
Lies a tombstone white
With the name of the late deceased;

And the epitaph drear,
A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East.

One might think that Kipling was prescient; perhaps so, perhaps not. For over eighty years, from 1838 to 1919, Britain attempted to subdue Afghanistan.This effort resulted in abject failure. One particular engagement is telling. In Jan. 1842 at a place called Khurd Kabul, a mountain pass, a British army of 4,500 soldiers was slaughtered. There was one lone survivor who lived to tell the tale, a doctor named William Brydon. Several years later Kipling wrote his poem.

On Dec. 24, 1979, the Soviet Union tried to tame Afghanistan. Over eight years later, the Red Army withdrew in defeat. In 1991, a little over two years after the embarrassing withdrawal, the Soviet Union ceased to exist. U.S. involvement in the war in Afghanistan has now lasted over eight years.

There are Americans who are concerned about this most recent past. There are Americans who are concerned about the continued killing and wounding of our treasured troops and ask why. There is virtually nothing in the dirt-poor, resourceless, and strategically impotent Afghanistan that has anything worth dying for, save for a mythical pipeline that no corporation in its right mind would build due to the volatility of the area, which has existed for centuries. Afghanistan is a tribal society with a culture that lives by the gun. That said, recent headlines fills one with despair.

Nick Turse of Tom Dispatch provided news you are not going to hear on the MSN. To many, it was revealing and disconcerting. It would appear that the infrastructure boom that many expected when Obama took office is happening. Unfortunately, it is not happening in the U.S. It is happening in Afghanistan, and the goal is military infrastructure. Turse states, “While the United States officially insists that it is not setting up permanent bases in Afghanistan, the scale and permanency of the construction underway at Bagram seems to suggest, at the least, a very long stay. According to published reports, in fact, the new terminal facilities for the complex aren’t even slated to be operational until 2011.”

The rest of the story…

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