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Posts Tagged ‘David Cameron’

0847: Laura Kuenssberg tweets:

So plan your day! Stephenson up at 12, then Met head of press, then Yates at 1.15. Then 2.30 Rupert + James Murdoch, then Rebekah Brooks.”

MPs to quiz Murdochs over hacking

BBC, 19 July 2011

News Corporation chiefs Rupert and James Murdoch and former executive Rebekah Brooks will be quizzed by MPs later about the phone-hacking scandal.

The Murdochs agreed to appear before the Commons media committee after it issued a summons for them.

The MPs said they had questions over evidence given by Mrs Brooks and Andy Coulson – both ex-News of the World (NoW) editors – at a hearing in 2003.

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The MPs who will quiz the Murdochs

NoW whistle-blower is found dead

BBC, 19 July 2011

A former News of the World journalist who made phone-hacking allegations against the paper has been found dead at his home in Watford.

Mr Hoare had told the New York Times hacking was far more extensive than the paper acknowledged when police first investigated hacking claims.

Sean Hoare also told the BBC’s Panorama phone hacking was “endemic” at the NoW.

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Phone-hacking: Dangers lurk for David Cameron

BBC, 19 July 2011

When bloodless coups come about in dictatorships, often it’s when the head of government is away on a foreign visit.

But democracies bring their own dangers for absent political leaders.

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LIVE: Phone-hacking latest

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By Oliver Wright and Nigel Morris, independent.co.uk
Saturday, 16 July 2011

From l-r: News International Chairman and Chief Executive James Murdoch, News International Chief Executive Rebekah Brooks, Former spokesman for the Prime Minister and former editor of News of the World Andy Coulson, Prime Minister David Cameron/Getty Images; Reuters; AP

The scale of private links between David Cameron and News International was exposed for the first time last night, with the Prime Minister shown to have met Rupert Murdoch’s executives on no fewer than 26 occasions in just over a year since he entered Downing Street.

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Once asked what his favourite joke was, David Cameron, leader of the Conservative Party and now Prime Minister, replied, “Nick Clegg”.

Nick Clegg is the leader of the Liberal-Democrat Party and is now the Deputy Prime Minister.

Constructive talks between teams representing their two parties lasting a mere five days (it took the Germans 40 days to form their most recent government), and in which both made huge concessions to the other in order to form a stable government at a critical time in the nation’s history, have resulted in the first coalition government in this country in my lifetime.

David Cameron and Nick Clegg News conference – part 1

David Cameron and Nick Clegg News conference – part 2

Cameron hails ‘shift in politics’

Virgin Media

David Cameron has hailed “a historic and seismic shift” in Britain’s political landscape as he launched the country’s first coalition government since the Second World War.

The new Prime Minister marked his inaugural day in office by handing two major economic portfolios to his Liberal Democrat allies, anointing Vince Cable as Business Secretary and David Laws as Chief Secretary to the Treasury.

He also promised “very early legislation” to establish fixed-term Parliaments, effectively enshrining in law the Conservatives’ five-year coalition deal with the Lib Dems.

At a joint news conference with new Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg – held in the garden of No 10 – Mr Cameron said the award of a total of five Cabinet jobs to Lib Dems underlined the parties’ “sincere determination” to work together.

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It never ceases to amaze and move me the grace with which the losing girls make their exit from Over the Rainbow – a grace which Gordon Brown also displayed as he made his final departure from Number 10 Downing Street.

Last Thursday, the British electorate went to the polls to elect a new government. Although there were still 53 seats to declare, it was clear, by the time I got up on Friday morning, that there was no clear winner and that we were well into “hung parliament territory” — where no party has an outright majority and either the largest party has to seek to govern alone or two of the three major parties form a coalition.

“The British people have spoken, Lord (Paddy) Ashdown, a former leader of the Liberal Democrat Party declared, “only nobody seems to know what they’ve said.” (The general consensus seems to be that the result is not a repudiation of the Labour Party, which Gordon Brown leads, but of Brown himself, and it is not an endorsement of David Cameron and the Conservatives, who have the largest number of seats.)

The leaders of Britains’s third largest party, the Liberal Democrats suddenly found themselves, therefore, in the role of “kingmaker”, as they opened began negotiations with the party which had gained the most seats, the Conservative Party, while Gordon Brown, the current Prime Minister and leader of the Labour Party which has governed the country for the last thirteen years, remained in 10 Downing Street, the UK premier’s official residence, and considered his options. (more…)

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Posters in London on Wednesday expressed anger over perceived economic injustice, with experts predicting hard times ahead

By JOHN F. BURNS and LANDON THOMAS Jr. | NYT | Published: May 5, 2010

LONDON — Even with rioters on the streets of Athens and the 16 countries using the euro threatened with mounting turmoil, the economy remained the most frequently — and least candidly — discussed topic here as the three main parties entered the last hours of a monthlong general election campaign.

Much of the wrangling centered on arguments about which party was hiding most from the voters on the true state of the economy and its plans for dealing with it. With government deficits in Britain second in Europe only to those of Greece, some analysts even suggested that this might be a good election to lose.

But one conclusion seemed clear: Whoever wins will be forced to make deep and unpopular cuts, a task made all the more difficult if the closely contested election produces, as many commentators have forecast, a hung Parliament or a fragile coalition arrangement that might delay important economic decisions.

“This is a ticking time bomb,” said Ruth Lea, an economic adviser at the Arbuthnot Banking Group who worked at the Treasury in London in 1976 when Britain, in its worst financial crisis since World War II, was forced to go to the International Monetary Fund for assistance. “If the next government does not come to grips with this, the I.M.F. will have to come in. I remember, it was very, very humiliating.”

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tony_blair

SPECULATION was growing last night that Tony Blair, the former prime minister, will shortly be installed as the first president of Europe, with an expected Yes vote in the second Irish referendum on the Lisbon Treaty.

Source

Tories will block ‘President Blair’

The Tories have issued a warning to European leaders not to appoint Tony Blair as the first EU president.

The former prime minister has re-emerged as a potential candidate following reports he has won the backing of French president Nicolas Sarkozy, while German chancellor Angela Merkel has eased her opposition.

But shadow foreign secretary William Hague said the Conservatives were prepared to lobby European capitals in an effort to block the appointment.

Source

German chancellor Angela Merkel fury at Cameron ‘hostility to EU’ as she downgrades ties with Tories

David Cameron is at loggerheads with German politicians over his ‘hostile’ stance on Europe.

They were devastated by the Tory leader’s threat to hold a referendum on the Lisbon Treaty, which was masterminded in Berlin.

Chancellor Angela Merkel was also angered by Mr Cameron’s decision to remove Conservative MEPs from the federalist European People’s Party group in Brussels.

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15229609

Normally, on Wednesday afternoon, the House of Commons is transformed into a bickering cockpit as the Prime Minister faces Prime Minister’s Question Time. It begins with a routine question about the PM’s engagements and is followed by questions from the leader of the main opposition party (currently, David Cameron, leader of the Conservative Party), and leader of the second biggest opposition party (the Liberal Democrats).

Then junior MPs vie to gain the eye of the Speaker of the House of Commons who will invite other MPs to speak, addressing them not by their  name but as, “The Right Honourable Member for…”, followed by the name of their constituency (Electoral District being the US equivalent), and the Prime Minister seeks to parry any hostile questions with the benefit of the briefing he is given by key advisors before this time-hallowed spectacle, which enthrals some and appals others, takes place.

Today, however, politics was silent, as PM Gordon Brown stood up to express his condolences to David Cameron, whose six-year-old son, Ivan, died early this morning of complications arising from Cerebral Palsy. What made the Prime Minister’s tribute deeply moving was that Gordon Brown himself lost his own prematurly-born first child who died ten days after she had been born.

In the words of a BBC correspondent, the Prime Minister and the Man Who Would Be Prime Minister are now united by an extraordinary bond as both have lost first-born children.

Out of respect for Ivan and his family, PMQs was cancelled.

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1_fullsizeThe new battle in British politics is how to be most like Obama

James Forsyth says that both Brown and Cameron are mesmerised by the new President, who will be the lodestar of political life in this country. The contest to lay claim to his policies and style has begun — the risk being that our leaders are found sorely wanting by comparison

Read original article in The Spectator

Also in The Spectator:

 

Rod Liddle says that television news is intrinsically biased: it transforms what it reports. In the case of the economy, ministers are right to counteract this with a dose of optimism

thisissue_300After the revolution

It is 30 years since Ayatollah Khomeini ousted the Shah of Iran, ending 2,000 years of monarchical rule and heralding the age of radical Islamism. Since then, the US has had no diplomatic relations with Iran. But is that about to change with the arrival of Barack Obama?

Why Iran must be brought in from the cold

And so, the work began

The rhetoric may not have soared, but Obama’s inaugural speech proved that he is more than ready to get down to business

(more…)

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