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Posts Tagged ‘Common Sense’

By Kathy Malloy | OpEdNews | February 21, 2011 at 18:26:30

There’s a lesson to be learned, Truthseekers, from our former countrymen in Great Britain. The media here isn’t covering this, for obvious reasons, but England is experiencing a very different kind of Tea Party uprising and we would do well to take notice.

Unlike the bizarro backward movement here, where otherwise normal Americans are taking to the streets to protest policies that would further cut their wages, benefits, health care coverage, and public services they rely upon, in England the protests are against (gasp!) the corporations and pro-corporate government policies that are ravaging their economy.

Now, doesn’t it make more sense to speak out against tax-evading Big Corporations who have created the recession than attack the very progressive policies that attempt to improve our standard of living?

Johann Hari thinks so, and that is the topic of his very thoughtful, very important article How to Build a Progressive Tea Party, which appears in the current issue of The Nation magazine. Please read it. In light of President’s Day, Thomas Paine couldn’t have said it better himself.

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The Age of Paine

Scott Tucker | Truthdig | July 3, 2009

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“We have it in our power to begin the world over again,” wrote Thomas Paine in “Common Sense,” the revolutionary pamphlet published in January 1776. Ronald Reagan quoted those words on July 17, 1980, when he addressed the Republican National Convention and accepted his party’s presidential nomination. Reagan led a coalition of corporate oligarchs, imperial crusaders and Christian fundamentalists to power, and to this day Reaganism remains the official gospel of the old guard in the Republican Party. The republican and social democratic ideals of Paine are long lost to many modern partisan Republicans and Democrats, but many memorable phrases of Paine still fill the mouths of career politicians.

When the Iraq war, a broken health care system and a plunging economy gave the Democratic Party a political advantage, Barack Obama raised hopes and promised change. When Obama gave his inaugural address on Jan. 20, 2009, he too quoted Paine, this time from the first of 13 articles collected in “The American Crisis”—an article Gen. Washington ordered read to his troops before crossing the Delaware River on Christmas 1776 to fight the Hessian mercenaries of King George III: “Let it be told to the future world … that in the depth of winter, when nothing but hope and virtue could survive … that the city and country, alarmed at one common danger, came forth to meet it.” Reagan and Obama each lifted some good lines from Paine for their own rhetorical purposes; but each likewise cared more for stagecraft than for the original script.

Original article

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