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Archive for the ‘internet’ Category

Google-Verizon Deal: The End of The Internet as We Know It

Huff Post-  Josh Silver – President, Free Press

Posted: August 5, 2010 09:26 AM

For years, Internet advocates have warned of the doomsday scenario that will play out on Monday: Google and Verizon will announce a deal that the New York Times reports “could allow Verizon to speed some online content to Internet users more quickly if the content’s creators are willing to pay for the privilege.”

The deal marks the beginning of the end of the Internet as you know it. Since its beginnings, the Net was a level playing field that allowed all content to move at the same speed, whether it’s ABC News or your uncle’s video blog. That’s all about to change, and the result couldn’t be more bleak for the future of the Internet, for television, radio and independent voices.

How did this happen? We have a Federal Communications Commission that has been denied authority by the courts to police the activities of Internet service providers like Verizon and Comcast. All because of a bad decision by the Bush-era FCC. We have a pro-industry FCC Chairman who is terrified of making a decision, conducting back room dealmaking, and willing to sit on his hands rather than reassert his agency’s authority. We have a president who promised to “take a back seat to no one on Net Neutrality” yet remains silent. We have a congress that is nearly completely captured by industry. Yes, more than half of the US congress will do pretty much whatever the phone and cable companies ask them to. Add the clout of Google, and you have near-complete control of Capitol Hill.

A non-neutral Internet means that companies like AT&T, Comcast, Verizon and Google can turn the Net into cable TV and pick winners and losers online. A problem just for Internet geeks? You wish. All video, radio, phone and other services will soon be delivered through an Internet connection. Ending Net Neutrality would end the revolutionary potential that any website can act as a television or radio network. It would spell the end of our opportunity to wrest access and distribution of media content away from the handful of massive media corporations that currently control the television and radio dial.

So the Google-Verizon deal can be summed up as this: “FCC, you have no authority over us and you’re not going to do anything about it. Congress, we own you, and we’ll get whatever legislation we want. And American people, you can’t stop us.

MORE HERE

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Lieberman Backpedals on Internet Kill Switch. Kinda. NOT!

FDL- Lisa Derrick Sunday June 20, 2010 1:22 pm

Two ago weeks Senator Joe “Turncoat” Lieberman, along with Maine’s Sen. Susan Collins and Sen. Tom Carper of Delaware proposed the Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act, an internet kill switch which any POTUS, any time could flick to shut off the Intertoobs. And keep them shut off indefinitely. Much outrage and uproar ensued.

Sunday on CNN Loserman tried to explain that what he had in mind was not a total “All Your Base Are Belong to Us” move, but rather a partial Internet shut down. And why? Because other countries already have that in place and we have to keep up with the Hu Jintaos?

Right now China, the government, can disconnect parts of its Internet in case of war and we need to have that here too.

Wait, wut? Haven’t we been busy decrying actions like that as being all mean and stuff, and talking about how awful it that China can’t have Google or goatse, like real a democracy? And how it sucked that Pakistan shut down Facebook and Google on “Everybody Draw Mohammad Day”?

Lieberman goes on to explain that people are just over reacting and that the bill not censorship. Oh rilly? Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset would force private websites to comply with broad cybersecurity measures and allow the President to disconnect Internet networks. The president’s power to shut down parts of the Web could be renewed indefinitely under the bill.

But it’s not a big deal, says Lieberman:

We need this capacity in a time of war. We need the capacity for the president to say, ‘Internet service provider, we’ve got to disconnect the American Internet from all traffic coming in from another foreign country, or we have to put a patch on this part of it’.

So I say to my friends on the Internet, relax. Take a look at the bill. And this is something that we need to protect our country.

Lieberman seems like he’s trying to sell this piece of legislation as (thought process/spin):

Oh noes, nasty people could mess with the internets and use them to cause and spread misinformation.

Well, yeah, and how is that different from our not-so upheavally present day?

Please email your senators on both side of the aisle with your opinions on the matter.

[HT: Raw Story]

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Senators introduce bill that would allow US to disconnect the Internet

RAW STORY- By John Byrne
Friday, June 18th, 2010 — 8:02 am

Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-CT), along with one Republican and Democratic senator, introduced a bill late last week that would allow the President to effectively disconnect the internet by emergency decree.

The Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act would allow the President to disconnect Internet networks and force private websites to comply with broad cybersecurity measures.

Future US presidents would have their Internet “kill switch” powers renewed indefinitely.

The bill was introduced by Lieberman, Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) and Sen. Tom Carper (D-DE). A parallel bill was drafted last year by Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-WV) and Sen. Olympia Snowe (R-ME) which would allow the federal government to unilaterally “order the disconnection” of certain websites.

“For all of its ‘user-friendly’ allure, the Internet can also be a dangerous place with electronic pipelines that run directly into everything from our personal bank accounts to key infrastructure to government and industrial secrets,” Lieberman said in a release announcing his bill. “Our economic security, national security and public safety are now all at risk from new kinds of enemies — cyber-warriors, cyber-spies, cyber-terrorists and cyber-criminals.

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Lenders are using social graphs to determine how creditworthy you are. (Getty Images)

Banks now checking your Twitter and Facebook activity to see if you’re worthy of getting a loan

AMERICAblog- by John Aravosis (DC) on 1/22/2010 10:29:00 AM

Please write financially secure comments to this post:

Your social networking chit-chat could have an impact on your credit – specifically on whether banks think you are worthy of a loan.

Creditors are checking out what you post to your Facebook and Twitter accounts. They’re checking out who your friends are and who the people are in your networks.

The presumption is that if your friends are responsible credit cardholders and pay their bills on time, you could be a good credit customer…

How long until health insurance companies do the same?

The banks claim they’re just checking you out for “marketing” purposes, then they admit it’s actually about whether to give you loans or credit:

Pretty much everything you and your network reveal may be compiled, including status updates, “tweets,” joining online clubs, linking a Web site or posting a comment on a blog or news Web site….

Another reason credit issuers are looking to this data is to reduce lending risk. Social graphs allow credit issuers to know if you’re connected to a community of great credit customers. Creditors can see if people in your network have accounts with them, and are free to look at how they are handling those accounts.

The presumption is that if those in your network are responsible cardholders, there is a better chance you will be, too. So, if a bank is on the fence about whether to extend you credit, you may become eligible if those in your network are good credit customers.

“Credit card companies have been stung very hard during this downturn, and they’re going to work that much harder to avoid extending credit to people with a high level of predictable losses,” says Ken Clark, author of “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Boosting Your Financial IQ.” “Social graphs can preemptively cut the amount of charge-offs by not giving high-risk people a card. It may translate into hundreds of millions of dollars industry wide.”

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