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Archive for March 8th, 2011

When Henry Waxman speaks, it’s like listening to my Uncle Henry in the old days. The message is straight forward, honest, and carries a sort of authority that is rarely seen in todays political theatre. I’m sure that he has an agenda, but it seems to be about accountability, a trait that is sorely lacking in most representatives of the people. If Steney Hoyer or, on the Repugnican side John Boehner, was on the podium, my thoughts would immediately turn to* “6 lobbyist’s for every congre$$man”. I’m sure that Waxman has a few hanging around too, but I bet they have plenty of respect, and maybe even a little bit of fear, when approaching the man who tells it like it is.

Fighting Back: Defending Our Public Health

Representative Henry A. Waxman

March 7, 2011, 10:00am – 11:00am

About This Event

The recent unrest in the Middle East has sent oil and gasoline prices up, yet another reminder of our vulnerability from imported oil. Oil and America’s other persistent energy problems demand attention—reducing oil use, protecting our health by reducing air pollution, and boosting our economic competitiveness. Rather than address these challenges, however, House Republicans have substantially cut programs that safeguard public health and invest in clean technologies, and seek to strip the EPA’s authority to limit mercury, smog, and carbon pollution. Their proposed disinvestments in energy efficiency and renewable technologies would wave the white flag of surrender in the international race to lead the clean-tech industry in the 21st century.

Full video of the event can be found… ~HERE~

Waxman: ‘All That Seems To Matter Is What Koch Industries Think’

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Dems File Complaint Against Walker For Threats, Intimidation of Public Employees

Crooks & Liars- By Susie Madrak

March 08, 2011 07:00 AM

The Plum Line’s Greg Sargent has a copy of the complaint Wisconsin Dems are filing against Gov. Scott Walker during a call he thought was from David Koch, and he says it builds a persuasive case:

The complaint, which reflects a sense among Dems that all bets are off in this standoff, makes an interesting argument. By any reasonable standard, it says, Walker’s conduct should undermine “public trust” and fell well short of standards designed to ensure “the faith and confidence of the people of this state in their state public officials and state employees.”

The complaint focuses on several aspects of the prank call, but I think these two may be the most interesting:

16. Respondent states during the Call that he has the Attorney General’s office “looking into” strategies to force the Democratic senators to return. This constitutes a misuse of the independently elected office of the Attorney General for primarily political motivations.

And:

19. Respondent states during the Call that he will send out 5,000-6,000 layoff notices to public sector employees in an attempt to “ratchet up” pressure on the Democratic Senators. This use of threat against, and intimidation of, public sector employees for political purposes constitutes an unfair labor practice in violation of Wis. Stat. Section 111.84.

The complaint also alleges that it was improper for Walker to suggest to Koch that Republicans in swing areas might need shoring up, since this smacks of illegal coordination, though to my mind it isn’t clear what he was asking for. It also says that Walker’s claim that he “thought about” planting troublemakers in the crowd “constitutes a conspiracy to recklessly endanger public safety,” though here too it’s not quite clear what Walker really considered doing.

That said, even those examples were eyebrow-raising, and the complaint is worth reading, because it’s a reminder that taken together, Walker’s shenanigans on the call add up to conduct that by any reasonable measure should raise serious questions about Walker’s judgment and approach to his office. Some in the national media were quick to exonerate Walker after the call, but reading the complaint, the Wisconsin Democratic Party’s claim that his conduct risks undermining the public trust in state government doesn’t seem particulary unreasonable.

SOURCE

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