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Archive for February 6th, 2008

Report: Voter Turnout Records Broken

By- Suzie-Q @ 8:30 PM MST

WASHINGTON — Voters came out in record numbers in about half the states that have voted in presidential primaries so far, according to an analysis Wednesday.

Turnout among Republicans on Super Tuesday toppled a 20-year record in Alabama, according to the report issued by American University’s Center for the Study of the American Electorate. More than 16 percent of those eligible voted in the GOP race, compared with about 7 percent in 1988.

The report’s findings were based on unofficial results from the primaries held through Tuesday. Caucuses and California primary results were excluded.

Alabama had 58,000 new voters sign up in the three months leading up to Tuesday’s race, just one sign of newfound interest in a primary that used to be held in June and had little or no significance.

In Georgia, Democrats came out in droves to support Barack Obama, breaking a more than 30-year-old turnout record. More than 16 percent of eligible voters showed up at the polls Tuesday, compared with less than 15 percent in 1976.

“We are likely to see more records broken until the contests are decided, which in the Democratic Party’s case, at least may last until their convention,” said Curtis Gans, the center’s director who performed the analysis.

About 14 million people voted in the Democratic primaries this year compared with the slightly more than 10 million who voted in GOP primaries, according to the analysis.

Twenty states have held Democratic and Republican primaries so far.

Here are some of the report’s findings:

_Democratic primaries in 12 states set records. They are Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, South Carolina and Utah.

_Republican primaries in 11 states saw their highest percentages of voter turnout ever. They are Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Missouri, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Utah.

_Combining party turnouts, the highest percentage of eligible voters showing up this year came in New Hampshire _ 52 percent.

_Among the record-setting states, New York primaries had the lowest percentage of people voting with just more than 18 percent of all those eligible casting votes.

___

On the Net:

http://www.american.edu/ia/cdem/csae/index.cfm

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By- Suzie-Q @ 8:00 PM MST

Guns N’ Roses- Sweet Child O’ Mine

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By- Suzie-Q @ 12:55 PM MST

Who’s the Democratic ‘establishment candidate’?

No one ever wants to be labeled the “establishment candidate,” especially on the Democratic side of the aisle. The phrase just reeks of stale, dull detachment. “Insurgent candidates” are exciting and lead movements of motivated activists; “establishment candidates” are safe but lackluster, more likely to curry favor with lobbyists than liberals. “Insurgent candidates” want to shake up the status quo; “establishment candidates” prefer not to rock the boat.

Last week, I heard some grumbling from Hillary Clinton supporters that Barack Obama, after picking up endorsements from Ted Kennedy and John Kerry, should be labeled an “establishment candidate.” It struck me as kind of silly, but apparently, the Clinton campaign itself starting pushing the idea on a conference call this morning.

…Hillary pollster Mark Penn repeatedly said Obama was becoming an “establishment candidate” — a rather strained effort to use Obama’s high-profile endorsements to weaken his insurgent appeal.

Asked about Obama’s loss in Massachusetts despite the Teddy Kennedy endorsement, Penn again reiterated the fact that voters making up their minds on the last day had broken for Hillary, suggesting (without quite saying) that this was somehow catalyzed by Obama’s new high-profile support.

“The more that Senator Obama has shifted to becoming an establishment campaign based on endorsements, people said, `You know, it’s really Senator Clinton who has the ideas for change,’” Penn told reporters.

Indeed, Penn suggested Obama would have done even better in Super Tuesday contests, were it not for the notion that voters rejected his “increasingly establishment-oriented campaign.”

I understand why the Clinton campaign would give this message a shot, but I’m skeptical that anyone is going to take it seriously.

Sure, Obama has picked up some high-profile congressional endorsements, but the truth is, Clinton has the support of 90 sitting members of Congress, while Obama has 63. (Obama’s backers seem to support him despite his role as an “insurgent candidate.”)

When it comes to superdelegates, all of whom are Democratic insiders, Clinton also enjoys more support than Obama.

But numbers aside, this spin turns everything we’ve seen the last year on its ear. Obama is, and has always been, the “insurgent candidate.” He’s followed in the Bill Bradley/Gary Hart footsteps of outsiders challenging the establishment. Indeed, by some measurements, Obama is the most successful insurgent candidate in a generation.

Clinton, on the other hand, has not only played the role of “establishment candidate,” she’s practically an incumbent. To be sure, Clinton is not your usual establishment figure — her policy ideas certainly reflect a candidate who’s willing to shake up the status quo — but she’s hardly the gatecrasher. Consider some of her top surrogates utilized earlier this year — Bill Clinton (President in the ’90s), Madeline Albright (Secretary of State in the ’90s), Wesley Clark (NATO commander in the ’90s), and Dick Gephardt (Democratic House Leader in the ’90s). Hardly the stuff of an outsider.

Put it this way: is anyone really prepared to characterize Hillary Clinton as the “insurgent candidate”? It seems like a stretch.

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Afternoon Jukebox… Why Don’t You And I

By- Suzie-Q @ 12:45 PM MST


Nickelback – Why Don’t You And I

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anthony @ 19:00 GMT

Staff | AP News | Feb 06, 2008 09:46 EST

The tone has changed in e-mails this Vermont town has been receiving on its proposal to issue warrants for the arrests of President Bush and Vice President Cheney. Now, more people are supporting the resolution.

Brattleboro’s town offices have been flooded with 7,000 e-mails since its selectboard voted Jan. 25 to include the item on its Town Meeting Day agenda.

Some of the earliest messages received were so full of vitriol that town officials said they were worried for their safety. Some writers called Brattleboro a bastion of “liberal appeaser wimps” and “wackjobs” for even considering the warrants.

Town Manager Barbara Sondag said any threatening emails are passed along to the police, although she said Tuesday that the nasty messages have subsided, replaced by ones supportive of the resolution.

Sondag’s office is reviewing every e-mail received and the issue is taking up 60 percent of her workers’ time.

Related story:

On June 16th during operation “Shock and Awe on the Oregon Coast”,, members of SQUADRON13-DEPLOYED recorded this arrest warrant for Bush and Cheney at City Hall in Newport Oregon.

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By- Suzie-Q @ 8:30 AM MST


Today’s Must Read

What a long way we’ve come.

Remember when Vice President Dick Cheney off-handedly admitted to an interviewer that “a dunk in the water” is a “no-brainer” if it can save lives? The White House did its utmost to deny the obvious.

But the strategy has changed. Now administration officials are proclaiming in the open that yes, the U.S. waterboarded three detainees, yes, it was legal, and yes, there’s a possibility we’d do so again. The stress, of course, is on the fact that waterboarding is not in the current authorized battery of interrogation techniques. But nevertheless, there it is. The administration has apparently decided that this is a debate they can win out in the open. From The Wall Street Journal (sub. req.):

Mark Lowenthal, a former senior CIA official who previously worked on Capitol Hill, said the debate over the aggressive antiterrorism tactics had become clouded by emotion and the administration brought forth the new details in an attempt to make its case more directly. “They feel like this debate has become…somewhat difficult, and they want to get it back on track,” said Mr. Lowenthal.

As we reported late yesterday, Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL) has already called for a criminal investigation. Anyone who watched Michael Mukasey’s performance one week ago knows what the answer will be.

WordPress.com Political Blogger Alliance

(more…)

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