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Archive for April 2nd, 2012

By Charles Dharapak, AP

USA TODAY
Mar 30, 2012
By David Jackson, USA TODAY
Updated  3d 8h ago

Another poll, another big lead for President Obama in a swing state — and more evidence he is benefiting from a growing gender gap.Obama leads Mitt Romney by 52%-35% in Wisconsin, according to a new NBC News/Marist Poll — thanks in large part to a 25-point lead among women voters, 55%-30%.

The president leads Republican candidate Rick Santorum by 51%-38% in Wisconsin, the poll says.

Obama’s approval rating is 50% in Wisconsin, a state he carried easily in 2008.

The Wisconsin numbers come the same week that a Quinnipiac Poll gives Obama leads in the swing states of Ohio, Pennsylvania and Florida — again with significant leads among women voters.

“Women back the president over Romney or Santorum by 6 to 19 percentage points in the three states,” Quinnipiac reports.

Obama’s strength among women voters comes after weeks of news coverage about such issues as health insurance coverage for contraceptives. The political battles have included objections by the Catholic Church to Obama policies on contraception coverage.

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Pew Research Center

Released: March 29, 2012

The gender gap in presidential politics is not new. Democratic candidates have gotten more support from women than men formore than 30 years. Even so, Barack Obama’s advantages among women voters over his GOP rivals are striking.

In the Pew Research Center’s most recent national survey, conducted March 7-11, Obama led Mitt Romney by 20 points (58% to 38%) among women voters. It marked the second consecutive month that Obama held such a wide advantage over Romney among women (59% to 38% in February). In both February and March, Obama ran about even with Romney among men.

In the March survey, Obama’s overall lead over Rick Santorum was 18 points. Fully 61% of women voters said they would favor Obama in a matchup with Santorum, compared with just 35% who backed the former Pennsylvania senator.

The gender gap – the difference in support for a candidate among women and men – is about as wide today as it was at this point in the campaign four years ago. In March 2008, both Democratic candidates, Obama and Hillary Clinton, had narrower overall leads over John McCain than Obama has today. Obama ran about even with McCain among men, but he led by 14 points among women (53% to 39%). Clinton trailed among men, yet also led by 14 points among women.

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