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Archive for April 11th, 2009


FDA requires no tracking system for clones or labeling of products produced from clones or their offspring.

centerforfood safety.org

(January 15, 2008) Washington, DC – Today, the Center for Food Safety (CFS) condemned the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) irresponsible determination that milk and meat from cloned animals are safe for sale to the public. In addition, the FDA is requiring no tracking system for clones or labeling of products produced from clones or their offspring. This action comes at a time when the U.S. Senate has voted twice to delay FDA’s decision on cloned animals until additional safety and economic studies can be completed by the National Academy of Sciences and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

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Don’t worry, bee happy


Well, here it is from the horses mouth folks. BIO bragging about their lobbying efforts during the Bu$h administration. All we can hope for is that the horse wasn’t genetically altered with Bill Orielly’s genes, because, needless to mention, that would be like mr. Ed’s worst night mare.

About BIO

Government Relations

“Most biotech observers look to Wall Street for insights on the industry’s prospects, but in fact, what happens in Washington and the statehouses has a profound impact on the bottom line. In 2002, BIO’s Government Relations Department won a number of legislative victories, with the signing of laws to limit liability, improve biodefense and promote biotech research. Equally important,BIO’s lobbying team beat back measures that would have decimated intellectual property protection and permitted reimportation of potentially dangerous counterfeit drugs. BIO also staked out positions on issues that remain in play as of early 2003, including proposals to expand Medicare drug coverage and change stock option accounting.”

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‘These People Fear Prosecution’: Why Bush’s CIA Team Should Worry About Its Dark Embrace of Torture

By Liliana Segura, AlterNet. Posted April 11, 2009.

The New Yorker‘s Jane Mayer discusses the fallout from the Red Cross’ shocking report on CIA torture and its serious legal implications.

On the night of April 6, a long-secret document was published — in its entirety for the first time — that provided a clear, stark look at the CIA torture program carried out by the Bush administration.

Dated Feb. 14, 2007, the 41-page report describes in harrowing detail the “ill treatment” of 14 “high-value” detainees in U.S. custody, as recounted by the prisoners in interviews with the International Committee of the Red Cross.

Besides listing the various kinds of harsh interrogation tactics undertaken by the CIA — among them “suffocation by water,” “prolonged stress standing,” “beatings by use of a collar,” “confinement in a box,” “prolonged nudity,” “threats,” “forced shaving” and other methods — the report reveals the disturbing role of medical professionals in the torture of suspects, which included using doctors’ equipment to monitor their health, even as torture was carried out.

Just as Americans have known about Bush-era torture for years, lawyers and human rights activists have long known about the ICRC report and its contents. Both are due in large part to the work of journalists and the sources who have brought to light the many post-9/11 abuses committed in the name of counterterrorism.

In February 2005, Jane Mayer of the New Yorker magazine published a story called “Outsourcing Torture: The Secret History of America’s ‘Extraordinary Rendition’ Program,” which reported in intricate detail the sordid mechanisms of the Bush administration’s kidnap-and-torture program — a practice so violent and dramatic that it inspired a major Hollywood film a few years later.

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